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Take a girl like you kingsley amis

This perceptive coming of age novel about a northern girl who moves south, wants to fit in and yet wants to preserve her principles, challenges our assumptions about the battle of the sexes and classes in Britain. It is a story about 'the squalid business of the man and the woman' and 'the most wonderful thing that had ever happened' to Jenny Bunn. Few twentieth century novelists have explored our preoccupation with sex like Kingsley Amis. The results are surprising and often hilarious. Kingsley Amis's works take a humorous yet highly critical look at British society, especially in the period following the end of World War II. Amis also wrote poetry, criticism, and short stories.

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A still from the film version of Take a Girl Like You. He was much in demand as a reviewer and journalist, and he could afford monthly visits to London, where he would drink from lunch until closing time. Just then a bandaged man in his underwear staggered into the room. This, Mavis told her guest, is Kingsley Amis.

Geoff was his former student, and Mavis his mistress. Amis led a complicated life. Lucky Jim had introduced a new type: Jim Dixon exemplified the young men rising from lower middle class through the universities in the postwar welfare state. The view on his characters was mixed. I am told that today rather more than 60 per cent of the men who go to university go on a Government grant. This is a new class that has entered upon the scene. It is the white-collar proletariat.

Kingsley Amis is so talented, his observation so keen, that you cannot fail to be convinced that the young men he so brilliantly describes truly represent the class with which his novel is concerned.

They do not go to university to acquire culture but to get a job, and when they have got one, scamp it.

They have no manners, and are woefully unable to deal with any social predicament. Their idea of a celebration is to go to a public house and drink six beers.

They are mean, malicious and envious … Charity, kindness, generosity, are ideas they hold in contempt. They are scum. But in , when Amis started writing Take a Girl Like You its working title was Song of the Wanderer , it was bad behavior that had come to interest him most. Whether he qualifies as scum is a matter for the reader to decide. The novel was still unfinished when Amis was invited to spend the —59 academic year in Princeton. He had put it aside to write I Like It Here.

The slightest of his first three books, I Like It Here is a near-autobiographical account, supplemented with a mystery plot, of the months he spent with his family in Portugal, where he went reluctantly after Lucky Jim was awarded the Somerset Maugham Prize, which stipulated travel abroad. Snow and Priestley as a serious chronicler of our society.

In Portugal, Princeton, and Swansea, Amis made elaborate notes for the novel, drawing parallels between its characters and those of Hamlet. It looks like being about as long as War and Peace at the moment. I think I have devised a character who can say more of what I think than any previous. Time will show. What he thinks about mostly is women, and the one he thinks most about is Jenny Bunn. Not only that: all this moral business was poor equipment for one barely into his stride on the huge trek to satiety.

Will Patrick be patient? Will he propose marriage? Will he bugger off? Or will he take what he wants by force, his nastiness finally getting the better of him? The majority of chapters belongs to Jenny.

Patrick has a hard time loosening himself from a state of agitation. He constantly puts the Jenny problem through various analytic frameworks. He takes Jenny out one night, kisses her, then immediately apologizes. Not just not attractive. A positive quality. A great British prime minister once remarked that the people were divided into two nations, the rich and the poor, and in effect that these had no knowledge of each other.

One might say the same, perhaps, of those who live in parts of the world where segregation by races is practised. But these barriers, or the reasons for them, belong to a part of our history which is fortunately passing away.

There is one barrier, however, which no amount of progress or tolerance or legislation can ever diminish. On a smaller scale, the conflict between attraction and morality, or simply attraction and expectation, is the central dilemma of Take a Girl Like You.

Does this fulfill the criteria of nonprofound seriousness Amis set for the novel? If being serious means looking at bad, even criminal, behavior straight on, I believe it does. Not so, Patrick. Amis said Take a Girl Like You was his favorite of his novels.

Reprint ed with permission. Remember Me. By Christian Lorentzen May 4, Books. Amis doing an Evelyn Waugh impersonation.

Take A Girl Like You by Kingsley Amis (1960)

Jenny is a beauty and men and women are crazy about her, most of all handsome Patrick Standish, who Jenny also likes. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. She is an improbable but convincing blend of sexy good looks with solid domestic instincts, feminine gentleness with the toughness of the slums.

Young Jenny Bunn comes to infant-teach outside of London and is quite determined to lose the narrow-minded ideas of her north country home. She is helped on her way by the owners of her digs, Dick and Martha Thompson, a fellow boarder, Anna le Page, assorted acquaintances and Patrick Standish, teaching in a nearby college, who resists falling seriously in love with her.

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Take a Girl Like You

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Dispatched from the UK in 11 business days When will my order arrive? Renata Adler. Leonora Carrington. Professor Magda Szabo. Silvina Ocampo. Bonnie Huie. Richard Greeman. Patrick Leigh Fermor.

Take A Girl Like You

Surprisingly long at pages in the Penguin paperback edition, ie this novel has the same weight and heft as a modern literary classic, as Lawrence or Conrad or Foster, but its subject matter is unclassically slender. She finds a rented room in a house owned by an older man, auctioneer Dick Thompson and his wife, Martha, sharing along with the other boarder, the podgy French girl, Anna le Page. In the voice of Patrick, who emerges as her main suitor:. Oh lordy lordy lordy, how lovely she was, with all that thick inky-black hair and the slightly hollow cheeks and the faint blue veins at the temples and the very definite natural line surrounding the lips and the lips themselves and and and and and and.

Post a Comment. He was one of the great comic novelists of the 20th Century, and also a long-time proponent of SF and a writer of a number of SF novels and short stories.

An account of the writing — and reading, and other stuff — in my life by Andrew Cartmel. Post a Comment. Continuing my modestly ambitious project of reading all of Kingsley Amis's novels inspired by Zachary Leader's admirable and definitive biography of Amis , I have just finished Take a Girl Like You.

Take a Girl Like You

Higher Education. Jenny is a beauty and men and women are crazy about her, most of all handsome Patrick Standish, who Jenny also likes. Get the latest news on all things Higher Education.

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King of Shaft: A Review of Take a Girl Like You by Kingsley Amis

Documented as a personal favorite of Kingsley Amis, Take a Girl Like You , originally published in , is peopled with subsidiary characters, ranging from the posh and pedantic to the proletarian and pessimistic. These characters, with names like Julian Ormerod or Dick Thompson, mildly stimulate most scenes with their eccentricity, such as at meals or an impromptu shooting competition. The reader is first introduced to the twenty-year-old Jenny Bunn, an old-fashioned working-class girl who recently moved to a small town near London to teach primary school children. It is touched upon, without any further elaboration, that she wants to escape the hurt of an ex-lover. Whilst interacting with the eccentric characters of this town, she receives a constant but low jolt of cognitive dissonance in regard to maintaining her idea of a pre-coital nuptial.

Apr 16, - Birthday Review: Take a Girl Like You, by Kingsley Amis a review by Rich Horton Kingsley Amis was born 16 April He was one of the.

The narrative follows the progress of twenty-year-old Jenny Bunn, who has moved from her family home in the North of England to a small town not far from London to teach primary school children. Jenny is a 'traditional' Northern working-class girl whose dusky beauty strikes people as being at odds with the old-fashioned values she has gained from her upbringing, not least the conviction of 'no sex before marriage'. A thread of the novel concerns the frustrations of the morally dubious Patrick Standish, a year-old teacher at a local private secondary school and his attempts to seduce Jenny; all this occurs against a backdrop of Jenny's new teaching job, Patrick's work and his leisure time with flatmate and colleague Graham and their new acquaintance, the well-off and somewhat older man-about-town, Julian Ormerod.

A still from the film version of Take a Girl Like You. He was much in demand as a reviewer and journalist, and he could afford monthly visits to London, where he would drink from lunch until closing time. Just then a bandaged man in his underwear staggered into the room. This, Mavis told her guest, is Kingsley Amis.

Basket 0. I have for the first time found what I can truly love — I have found you. You are my sympathy — my better self — my good angel.

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